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Jean-Michel Basquiat
Artwork: Jean-Michel Basquiat, Untitled (IDEAL) , 1987
Jean-Michel Basquiat
Untitled (IDEAL) , 1987
Wax crayon on paper
Unframed: 74.9 x 56.5 cm (29 1/2 x 22 1/4 in.) Framed: 120.7 x 100.3 cm (47 1/2 x 39 1/2 in.)
Sonia Boyce
Artwork: Sonia Boyce, Errollyn, 2021
Sonia Boyce
Errollyn, 2021
Digital pigment print
60 x 40 cm (23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in.)
Edition 3 of 5 + 1 AP + 2 EC
Artwork: Sonia Boyce, Jacqui, 2021
Sonia Boyce
Jacqui, 2021
Digital pigment print
60 x 40 cm (23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in.)
Edition 3 of 5 + 1 AP + 2 EC
Artwork: Sonia Boyce, Poppy, 2021
Sonia Boyce
Poppy, 2021
Digital pigment print with acrylic gloss varnish
60 x 40 cm (23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in.)
Edition 3 of 5 + 1 AP + 2 EC
Artwork: Sonia Boyce, Tanita, 2021
Sonia Boyce
Tanita, 2021
Digital pigment print with glitter
50 x 50 cm (19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.)
Edition 3 of 5 + 1 AP + 2 EC
Sonia Boyce is recognised for her thought-provoking depictions of intimate social encounters. This year, Boyce represents the UK at the...

Tanita, 2021 (Detail)

Sonia Boyce is recognised for her thought-provoking depictions of intimate social encounters. This year, Boyce represents the UK at the Biennale di Venezia with FEELING HER WAY – for which she was awarded the Golden Lion for Best National Participation – an audio collage centred around the vocal performances of five Black female musicians, which relates to the ongoing Devotional project that has occupied her for more than twenty years. This work depicts Tanita Tikaram, one of the singers included in the commission, and was produced from behind the scenes photography of the recording at Abbey Road Studios.

Artwork: Sonia Boyce, Sofia, 2021
Sonia Boyce
Sofia, 2021
Digital pigment print with glitter
60 x 40 cm (23 5/8 x 15 3/4 in.)
Edition 3 of 5 + 1 AP + 2 EC
Angela Bulloch
Artwork: Angela Bulloch, Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, 2021
Angela Bulloch
Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, 2021
Stainless steel, paint
259 x 80 x 50 cm (102 x 31 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.)
Photo: Ben Westoby

 Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, 2021 (Alternative Views)

 Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, 2021 (Alternative Views)

 Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, 2021 (Alternative Views)

Angela Bulloch’s sculpture possesses a stylised geometry that alludes to themes of minimalism and technology. Her work interrogates system and pattern, rules and the creative territory between mathematics and aesthetics, invoking the reductive visual language of classical Modernist sculpture. In Heavy Metal Stack of Five: People Eater, the powder-coated steel surfaces are painted in a combination of light and dark hues, creating the optical illusion of pushing and pulling planes. Designed within a digital imaging programme, each stacked rhombus appears distinct while at the same time relating to the others.

Serge Attukwei Clottey
Artwork: Serge Attukwei Clottey, Connection zone, 2021
Serge Attukwei Clottey
Connection zone, 2021
Plastics and wires
152.4 x 157.5 cm (60 x 62 in.)
Artwork: Serge Attukwei Clottey, Aku yellow, 2021
Serge Attukwei Clottey
Aku yellow, 2021
duct tape, oil paint on cork board
152.4 x 124.5 cm (60 x 49 in.)
In his work, Serge Attukwei Clottey utilises everyday objects such as discarded Kufuor gallons, car tyres and recycled boat wood,...

Aku yellow, 2021 (Detail)

In his work, Serge Attukwei Clottey utilises everyday objects such as discarded Kufuor gallons, car tyres and recycled boat wood, uplifting these miscellaneous materials symbolic of Ghana’s vernacular economic system of trade and reuse. Clottey’s economic stance permeates his paintings as well as his sculptures. In his portraits, imbued with colour and texture, the artist employs cork and duct tape as a medium. Clottey’s fragmented approach to figuration recalls Western Cubist portraiture, a genre that drew heavily on formal elements of traditional African sculpture.

George Condo
Artwork: George Condo, Smiling Figure on Purple and Gold, 2014
George Condo
Smiling Figure on Purple and Gold, 2014
Acrylic, charcoal and pastel on linen
190.5 x 182.9 cm (75 x 72 1/8 in.) With artist's frame L 201 x 193 cm (79 1/8 x 76 in.)
Smiling Figure on Purple and Gold belongs to George Condo’s ongoing series of Drawing Paintings, a group of works begun...

Smiling Figure on Purple and Gold, 2014 (Installation View)

Smiling Figure on Purple and Gold belongs to George Condo’s ongoing series of Drawing Paintings, a group of works begun by the artist in 2009, which explore the reciprocal relationship between drawing and painting. In this painting the artists uses his personal brand of portraiture, Psychological Cubism, to document numerous psychological states: ‘I try to depict a character’s train of thoughts simultaneously’, he observes, ‘hysteria, joy, sadness, desperation’.

Artwork: George Condo, Untitled, 2018
George Condo
Untitled, 2018
Coloured Pencil on paper
76.2 x 106.7 cm (30 x 42 in.) Framed: 94.6 x 125.1 x 4.4 cm (37 1/4 x 49 1/4 x 1 3/4 in.)
Bernard Frize
Artwork: Bernard Frize, Ritz, 2000
Bernard Frize
Ritz, 2000
Acrylic on canvas
220 x 180 cm (86 5/8 x 70 7/8 in.)

Bernard Frize’s paintings are as much traces of an act, as they are physical marks of paint, colour and reflected light, rather than simple indexes of the act of painting. Created in 2000, Ritz required multiple painters – Frize and two assistants – each using two hands to move and then pass to his accomplices the bouquet of five brushes whose regulated crisscrossing drew the uninterrupted braid that became the subject of the painting. These traveling tangles of colour tightened or loosened, became saturated or depleted through their own movement across the canvas, and offer painting's analogue to a ‘train of thought’ in perpetual variation.

Philip Guston
Artwork: Philip Guston, At the table, 1969
Philip Guston
At the table, 1969
Acrylic on panel
76.2 x 81.3 cm (30 x 32 1/8 in.)

Produced in the wake of Philip Guston’s highly-anticipated return to painting after a two-year hiatus, At the Table exemplifies the humourous yet shrewd figurative style that typified his production during the last decade of his life. The painting depicts two of his signature hooded figures, shrouded in the uniform of the Ku Klux Klan. A meditation on culpability, identity and the evils of its contemporaneous social reality, At the Table was a vehicle for Guston to convey a message that was both personal and public during a time of artistic, political and social crisis.

Artwork: Philip Guston, Drawing for Cellar, 1970
Philip Guston
Drawing for Cellar, 1970
Charcoal on paper
43.9 x 61.1 cm (17 1/4 x 24 1/8 in.)
Keith Haring
Artwork: Keith Haring, Untitled , 1984-1985
Keith Haring
Untitled , 1984-1985
Felt-tip pen on paper
60 x 47.3 cm (24 x 19 in.)
Rachel Howard
Artwork: Rachel Howard, Clear, Map, Grid, 2018-2021
Rachel Howard
Clear, Map, Grid, 2018-2021
Oil on canvas
122 x 104 cm (48 1/8 x 41 in.)

In Rachel Howard’s abstract paintings chaos and control work in tandem. With a practice that is fundamentally concerned with the palpable sensation of contradiction, she manipulates the notion of painting – interrogating the medium, encouraging it to behave in unexpected and experimental ways. To create her lined paintings the artist builds up a structure, similar to a grid or a mesh of paint, only to unravel its foundations using varnish and turpentine. Determined by a combination of the weight and viscosity of the paint, the form of the painting relies upon precision and chance, as in Clear, Map, Grid where curlicues of pigment evoke a myriad of organic forms.

Artwork: Rachel Howard, Veronica (pink), 2022
Rachel Howard
Veronica (pink), 2022
Oil and acrylic on canvas
45.7 x 38.1 cm (18 x 15 in.)
Donna Huddleston
Artwork: Donna Huddleston, Crystal, 2022
Donna Huddleston
Crystal, 2022
Caran d'ache on paper
Unframed: 116.3 x 87.6 cm (45 3/4 x 34 1/2 in.) Framed: 123.7 x 95 cm (48 3/4 x 37 3/8 in.)

Rich with incident and gesture, Donna Huddleston’s drawings nuance sinister presence with ambiguous humour. The enigmatic figures that occupy her richly decorative world seduce with mystifying gestures and sideways glances that evade clear-cut narrative. In Crystal, Huddleston re-casts the cowgirl character that has appeared in earlier works, this time elaborated in a full colour portrait, in a continuation of her exploration of the theatrical themes of doubles, stand ins and performance.

Yun Hyong-keun
Artwork: Yun Hyong-keun, Burnt Umber & Ultramarine '96-#11, 1996
Yun Hyong-keun
Burnt Umber & Ultramarine '96-#11, 1996
Oil on linen
130.6 x 162.2 cm (51 3/8 x 63 7/8 in.)
Yun Seong-ryeol
Yun Hyong-keun was amongst the leading figures of the Korean Dansaekhwa art movement. Inspired by nature, his paintings combine a...

Burnt Umber & Ultramarine '96-#11, 1996 (Detail)

Yun Hyong-keun was amongst the leading figures of the Korean Dansaekhwa art movement. Inspired by nature, his paintings combine a palette of umber and ultramarine to create rectilinear compositions, reminiscent of traditional ink-wash paintings.

 

Vasily Klyukin
Artwork: Vasily Klyukin, VLN.12.21, 2021-22
Vasily Klyukin
VLN.12.21, 2021-22
Polycarbonate, plywood, acrylic
180 x 72 x 28 cm (70 7/8 x 28 3/8 x 11 1/8 in.)
Yayoi Kusama
Artwork: Yayoi Kusama, White on White, 1990
Yayoi Kusama
White on White, 1990
Acrylic on canvas
72.7 x 60.3 cm (28 5/8 x 23 3/4 in.) Framed: 76.2 x 63.5 x 4.4 cm (30 x 25 x 1 3/4 in.)
Artwork: William Mackinnon, Lets Begin Again, 2022
William Mackinnon
Lets Begin Again, 2022
Acrylic, oil and automotive enamel on linen
200 x 150 cm

Drawing on personal experiences and the landscapes of his native Australia, William Mackinnon’s paintings dwell in the space between the familiar and the unknown. Imposing landscapes and trees are both welcoming and menacing, revealing on one hand feelings of remoteness and abandonment, while on the other, the intimacy and domesticity of family life. In Lets Begin Again the artist ruptures the solitude of the remote landscape of his native Australia, introducing the presence of modern-day life in the form a vehicle, which illuminates the heart of the otherwise dark composition.

France-Lise McGurn
Artwork: France-Lise McGurn, Parfum, 2022
France-Lise McGurn
Parfum, 2022
Oil on canvas
50 x 50 cm (19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in.)

Fluidity is the watchword in France-Lise McGurn’s dream-like paintings. Her free- flowing, expressive gestures escape the boundaries of the traditional picture plane, bestowing a further sense of weightlessness to the dreamy and orgiastic contours of her subjects.

The pair of female figures in Untitled are seductive yet aloof, challenging the viewers with their distant and ambiguous gaze; inherently sexual yet ambivalent. Through their multifarious guises, they embody a sustained and collective presence, however fleeting their gestures might be.

France-Lise McGurn
Artwork: France-Lise McGurn, Berlin 2008, 2022
France-Lise McGurn
Berlin 2008, 2022
Oil on canvas
180 x 155 cm (70 7/8 x 61 1/8 in.)
Josephine Meckseper
Artwork: Josephine Meckseper, Fatale beauté, 2021
Josephine Meckseper
Fatale beauté, 2021
Acrylic on denim
167.4 x 167.4 x 4.6 cm (65 7/8 x 65 7/8 x 1 3/4 in.)
Photo: Dawn Blackman
Artwork: Josephine Meckseper, Empire of Signs, 2022
Josephine Meckseper
Empire of Signs, 2022
Acrylic paint on glass, acrylic paint on mannequin leg, acrylic paint on canvas (double sided), oil paint on wooden hand form in painted steel and glass vitrine with LED lights and acrylic sheeting
203.2 x 119.4 x 50.8 cm (80 x 47 1/8 x 20 in.)
Photo: Dawn Blackman
A'Driane Nieves
Artwork: A’Driane Nieves, These Days, My Horizons Hold So Much More, 2022
A’Driane Nieves
These Days, My Horizons Hold So Much More, 2022
Acrylic, house paint on Belgian linen
182.9 x 152.4 x 3.8 cm (72 x 60 x 1 1/2 in.)
Albert Oehlen
Artwork: Albert Oehlen, Klare Taschenbücher, 2002
Albert Oehlen
Klare Taschenbücher, 2002
Silkscreen and acrylic on canvas
200 x 168 cm (78 3/4 x 66 1/8 in.)
Paulina Olowska
Artwork: Paulina Olowska, Lois Chiles and Unknown, 2017
Paulina Olowska
Lois Chiles and Unknown, 2017
Oil on canvas
220 x 120 cm (86 5/8 x 47 1/4 in.)
Within Paulina Olowska’s practice, industry, leisure, and socialist symbolism occupy the same visual and cultural space. Her realist paintings, drawings,...
Lois Chiles and Unknown, 2017 (Detail)

Within Paulina Olowska’s practice, industry, leisure, and socialist symbolism occupy the same visual and cultural space. Her realist paintings, drawings, and collages borrow imagery from Eastern European and American popular culture creating a cross cultural reference that is evident throughout her practice, whilst engaging with the concepts of consumerism, feminism, and design. The outward appearance of Olowska’s female subjects is equally as important as the historical memories interwoven seamlessly throughout her collages and paintings. Olowska’s treatment of her subject’s materialization acts as a direct display of the spirit of the individual, which is likely to be contrasted against a uniformed surrounding reminiscent of life experienced behind the iron curtain.

Claudio Parmiggiani
Artwork: Claudio Parmiggiani, Untitled, 2019
Claudio Parmiggiani
Untitled, 2019
Smoke and soot on board
70 x 60.4 cm (27 1/2 x 23 3/4 in.)
Ocula and Charles Roussel
Georg Karl Pfahler
Artwork: Georg Karl Pfahler, DA-BGR, 1967 - 1968
Georg Karl Pfahler
DA-BGR, 1967 - 1968
Acrylic on canvas
180 x 160 x 3 cm (70 7/8 x 63 x 1 1/8 in.)

Georg Karl Pfahler rose to prominence in the early 1960s as one of the first hard- edge painters in Europe, known for his vibrant and colourful works. In DA-BGR Pfahler creates a dynamic composition of concentric fields of colour where two sharp areas of cherry and green are surrounded by a rounded blue form. Despite Pfahler’s combination of different hues in a vibrant interactive manner, the artist advocated the independence of colour: ‘Colour has a value of its own’, he wrote in 1968, ‘colour is weight, colour is quality, colour possesses an inherent limitation, of itself, through itself, through other colours, colour creates space, colour is form and space’.

Michelangelo Pistoletto
Artwork: Michelangelo Pistoletto, Varco Rettangolare, 2020
Michelangelo Pistoletto
Varco Rettangolare, 2020
Silkscreen on polished stainless steel
250 x 150 cm (98 3/8 x 59 1/8 in.)
Initiated in 1962, Pistoletto’s signature mirror paintings use the reflective picture plane to draw both viewer and environment into the...

Colori serigrafici, 2014 (Installation View)

 

Initiated in 1962, Pistoletto’s signature mirror paintings use the reflective picture plane to draw both viewer and environment into the work, thereby establishing an active relationship between artwork and spectator, while simultaneously creating a virtual space in which art and life can seamlessly interact. Varco Rettangolare belongs to a recent series of mirror paintings that depict barred gates and brick walls, evoking threats to freedom of movement and communication. Yet despite the restrictive ideas represented, the work is imbued with a deep sense of hope and optimism for new beginnings, the open doorway suggesting opportunity in the face of adversity.

Gerhard Richter
Artwork: Gerhard Richter, Flow, 2013
Gerhard Richter
Flow, 2013
Lacquer on glass mounted on Alu Dibond
37 x 37 cm (14 5/8 x 14 5/8 in.)
Thomas Schutte
Artwork: Thomas Schutte, Kleiner Geist, 1995
Thomas Schutte
Kleiner Geist, 1995
Cast aluminum
Height: 48 cm (18 7/8 in.)
Artwork: Thomas Schutte, Kleiner Geist, 1995
Thomas Schutte
Kleiner Geist, 1995
Cast aluminum
Height: 50 cm (19 3/4 in.)

 Kleiner Geist, 1995 (Alternative View)

 Kleiner Geist, 1995 (Alternative View)

 Kleiner Geist, 1995 (Alternative View)

Kleiner Geist forms part of one of Thomas Schütte’s most acclaimed series of sculptures, the Geister (‘ghosts’ or ‘spirits’), which defined the artist’s innovative aesthetic and conceptual repertoire during the 1990s. The series of Geister is an artistic vision of human form in which each figure delicately oscillates between masquerade and revelation, composition and deformation, thereby scrutinising the dichotomous perceptions of reality and phantasmagorical appearances.

Artwork: Thomas Schutte, Kleiner Geist, 1995
Thomas Schutte
Kleiner Geist, 1995
Cast aluminum
Height: 46 cm (18 1/8 in.)
Artwork: Thomas Schutte, Kleiner Geist, 1995
Thomas Schutte
Kleiner Geist, 1995
Cast aluminum
Height: 47 cm (18 1/2 in.)
Jim Shaw
Artwork: Jim Shaw, Man-Machine (Quiet), 2018
Jim Shaw
Man-Machine (Quiet), 2018
Acrylic on muslin
121.9 x 147.3 x 5.1 cm (48 x 58 x 2 in.)
Artwork: Jim Shaw, Obese Machine Man, 2020
Jim Shaw
Obese Machine Man, 2020
Acrylic on muslin
99.1 x 73.7 x 4.4 cm (39 x 29 x 1 3/4 in.)
Artwork: Jim Shaw, Religious Machine Man, 2020
Jim Shaw
Religious Machine Man, 2020
Acrylic on muslin
96.5 x 78.7 x 4.4 cm (38 x 31 x 1 3/4 in.)
Artwork: Jim Shaw, The Evening Bell, 2022
Jim Shaw
The Evening Bell, 2022
Acrylic on muslin
152.4 x 152.4 x 7 cm (60 x 60 x 2 3/4 in.)

Rendered in exquisite detail, Jim Shaw’s virtuosic work combines his analysis of the political, social and spiritual histories of the United States with contemplative reflections of his own psyche. Painted on a section of an old theatrical backdrop sourced by the artist, The Evening Bell explores imagery drawn from Shaw’s vast archive of vintage advertisements and cultural ephemera. A man stands with his head bowed, in reference to Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus (1857-1859), while the ringing of the church bell on the painting’s horizon marks the end of a day's work. Dressed in a lineman’s uniform, he stands beside a clotheshorse from which hangs a red cap and a large sign that reads ‘THINK’.

Erin Shirreff
Artwork: Erin Shirreff, Old friend, 2022
Erin Shirreff
Old friend, 2022
Dye sublimation prints on aluminum, latex paint
Framed: 140.3 x 135.3 x 14.6 cm (55 1/4 x 53 1/4 x 5 3/4 in.)
AP 1/2 of an edition of 5 + 2 AP
Cy Twombly
Artwork: Cy Twombly, Untitled , 1962
Cy Twombly
Untitled , 1962
Pencil, wax crayon, coloured pencil, watercolour, ballpoint pen on paper
50 x 70.4 cm (19 3/4 x 27 3/4 in.)
Artwork: Cy Twombly, Untitled, 1962
Cy Twombly
Untitled, 1962
Graphite, oil stick and ink on Fabriano paper
50.2 x 69.9 cm (19 4/5 x 27 1/2 in.)

Delivering the full force of Cy Twombly’s unique pictorial language, Untitled is emblematic of the ground-breaking body of work that Twombly created during his acclaimed Baroque period. Created five years after his career-defining move to the ancient city of Rome in 1957, Untitled at once invokes the classical past and his immediate contemporary experience. While his contemporaries were finding inspiration in popular culture, Twombly, starting in 1960, embarked upon a series of frenetic works inspired by the epic and dramatic panoramas and classical landscapes of the High Renaissance and Baroque.

Lee Ufan
Artwork: Lee Ufan, From Line No. 780323, 1978

Lee Ufan

From Line No. 780323, 1978
Glue and mineral pigment on canvas
97 x 130 cm (38 1/4 x 51 1/8 in.)
Chibuike Uzoma
Artwork: Chibụike Ụzọma, Plenty Vows, 2022
Chibụike Ụzọma
Plenty Vows, 2022
Oil and acrylic spray paint on canvas
213.4 x 152.4 cm (84 x 60 in.)

By treating art simultaneously as a subject and object, Chibuike Uzoma’s practice engenders the image with narrative complexes and superstition of meaning – making subject matter a pretext for performance and context a fluid ground. Plenty Vows is part of a broader body of work the artist calls KINDER PAINTINGS, a series that was initiated in 2019 and is still ongoing. The paintings explore possibilities in image-making and narrative through the peculiarities of aesthetic vocabularies performing simultaneously in a non-hierarchical model.

Artwork: Chibụike Ụzọma, Hajara, 2022
Chibụike Ụzọma
Hajara, 2022
Oil and acrylic spray paint on canvas
213.4 x 152.4 cm (84 x 60 in.)
Clare Woods
Artwork: Clare Woods, Game Changer, 2022
Clare Woods
Game Changer, 2022
Oil on aluminium
200 x 150 cm (78 3/4 x 59 1/8 in.)

The vulnerability of human life is an enduring theme running throughout Clare Woods’ oeuvre. Over the past few years, she has focused on still life flowers, explaining ‘For me, the idea of a vase of flowers represents a life span, in a tiny little environment. You’ve got the youth of the buds and the flowers are in full bloom, before they droop and discolour, and then the petals fall off and they die. It’s the whole life cycle that I am interested in’.

The dark palette of Game Changer exemplifies the artist’s gestural and dynamic approach to painting, defamiliarising the familiar and expressing strangeness through expansive, vigorous brushwork, compositional distortion and abstract colour.

Artwork: Clare Woods, Somethings Happened, 2022
Clare Woods
Somethings Happened, 2022
Oil on aluminium
100 x 150 cm (39 3/8 x 59 1/8 in.)
Christopher Wool
Artwork: Christopher Wool, Portrait (for M.A.), 1999
Christopher Wool
Portrait (for M.A.), 1999
Enamel on paper
91.4 x 58.4 cm (36 x 23 in.)
Artwork: Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2008
Christopher Wool
Untitled, 2008
Enamel on canvas
269.2 x 243.8 cm (106 x 96 in.)
For over 30 years, Christopher Wool has unceasingly explored the complexities of abstract painting, offering a continuous investigation into the...

For over 30 years, Christopher Wool has unceasingly explored the complexities of abstract painting, offering a continuous investigation into the medium at a time when many regarded the practice to be obsolete.

Artwork: Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2003
Christopher Wool
Untitled, 2003
Enamel on canvas laid on board
228.6 x 152.4 cm (90 x 60 in.)
Toby Ziegler
Artwork: Toby Ziegler, Seepage bed, 2022
Toby Ziegler
Seepage bed, 2022
Oil on aluminium
104.5 x 80 x 2 cm (41 1/8 x 31 1/2 x 3/4 in.)
Heimo Zobernig
Artwork: Heimo Zobernig, Untitled, 2012
Heimo Zobernig
Untitled, 2012
Acrylic on canvas
200 x 200 cm (78 3/4 x 78 3/4 in.)

In his work, Heimo Zobernig interrogates the formal language of Modernism, at its most familiar in the tropes of the monochrome and the grid, yet he is also concerned with Constructivism, colour theory and geometric abstraction. Since 1986, the artist has used the sans serif typeface Helvetica in his work. In the present work, he combines it with the words ‘REAL’ and ‘EGAL’ (German for ‘whatever’), which are written into one another, eradicating linguistic meaning in the process.

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