Frieze London

Online Viewing Room
7 - 16 October 2020
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For its 2020 Frieze London Viewing Room, Simon Lee Gallery is proud to present new and existing works by a selection of gallery artists including Angela Bulloch, Mel Bochner, Dexter Dalwood, Rachel Howard, Alex Hubbard, Donna Huddleston, Eric N. Mack, France-Lise McGurn, Paulina Olowska, Jim Shaw and Toby Ziegler, amongst others.
 

Highlights include Dexter Dalwood’s An Inadequate Painted History of Mexico XI, 2020, the sixth painting in his Mexico series, first conceived of during his 2018 residency at Casa Wabi; a new urethane painting by Alex Hubbard; Spider Painters, 2020, a riotous mixed media piece by Paulina Olowska; and Nuclear Family, 2020, by Toby Ziegler, which pays tribute to Jan van Eyck’s iconic Arnolfini Portrait and is presented in tandem with his exhibition at the London gallery. Ahead of his show, Hope Against Hope at the gallery later this autumn, Jim Shaw presents The Light of the West, 2020, which interrogates themes of wealth discrepancy in contemporary American society.

Making their debuts as part of the Simon Lee Gallery programme, Rachel Howard presents Slip Slide Curl Lick, 2020, an abstract painting that captures the artist’s concern with the interaction of chance and chaos in her practice, while Donna Huddleston’s Costume Drama, 2020, is a sumptuous drawing in colour pencil that explores the psychology of theatre. Rounding out the presentation is France-Lise McGurn’s luscious large-format painting, The Sun, 2020. McGurn is currently the subject of her first major solo museum exhibition at Kunsthaus Pasquart in Biel, Switzerland.

A selection of works from the Frieze Viewing Rooms presentation will be available to view at the gallery throughout Frieze week. 

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Eric N. Mack
Artwork: Eric N. Mack, Capital Heights (via stretch), 2019
Eric N. Mack
Capital Heights (via stretch), 2019
Mixed media
600 x 270 x 270 cm (236 1/4 x 106 1/4 x 106 1/4 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
$ 50,000
Eric N. Mack’s tactile creations, made from a dynamic combination of used textiles, worn clothes, moving blankets and torn rags,...

 Eric N. Mack, Capital Heights (via stretch), 2019. 

 

Eric N. Mack’s tactile creations, made from a dynamic combination of used textiles, worn clothes, moving blankets and torn rags, alongside photographs and pull-outs from books and magazines, extend and transform the notion of painting. His use of colour, form and material as elements in a compositional lexicon, as well as the stained or dyed fabrics which are his principal medium, declare the origin of his practice in the investigation of painting in an expanded field, while the way his compositions occupy and transform space are evidence of their architectural nature. They are at once paintings and sculptures, fully engaging with both disciplines. 

Rachel Howard
Artwork: Rachel Howard, Slip Slide Curl Lick, 2020
Rachel Howard
Slip Slide Curl Lick, 2020
Oil, acrylic and marker pen on canvas
94 x 78.7 cm (37 x 31 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 35,000

In Rachel Howard’s abstract paintings chaos and control work in tandem. With a practice that is fundamentally concerned with the palpable sensation of contradiction, she manipulates the notion of painting – interrogating the medium, encouraging it to behave in unexpected and experimental ways. To create her lined paintings the artist builds up a structure, similar to a grid or a mesh of paint, only to unravel its foundations using varnish and turpentine. Determined by a combination of the weight and viscosity of the paint, the form of the painting relies upon precision and chance, as in Slip Slide Curl Lick where curlicues of pigment evoke a myriad of organic forms.

Artwork: Rachel Howard, Lock Down (a reason), 2020
Rachel Howard
Lock Down (a reason), 2020
Oil on canvas
61 x 50.8 cm (24 x 20 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 22,500

Rachel Howard has drawn, painted, photographed and reimagined this walkway, at her farm in England, countless times over the last decade. For Howard, this leafy path delivers an opportunity to paint in the manner of masters of the Realist and Neo-Classical tradition, such as Corot and Courbet. Alternately hopeful and foreboding, the landscape alters with the season, the light, and the artist’s frame of mind.

Alex Hubbard
Artwork: Alex Hubbard, Gamer Fantasies, 2020
Alex Hubbard
Gamer Fantasies, 2020
Urethane, acrylic and oil on canvas
147.3 x 162.6 cm (58 x 64 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
Ben Westoby
£ 65,000

Installation View, Jeff Elrod, Alex Hubbard, Yang Shu, 2018, Simon Lee Gallery, Hong Kong

Installation View, Jeff Elrod, Alex Hubbard, Yang Shu, 2018, Simon Lee Gallery, Hong Kong

In Alex Hubbard’s paintings fields of colour in fiberglass and resin are interrupted with richly pooled, dripped and poured paint. Working with fast-drying materials, such as epoxy and  latex, the artist is forced to act quickly, embracing chance happenings and revelling in the autonomy of his chosen media. In Gamer Fantasies, pools of vivid red bleed into one another, enveloped by yellow and orange swathes of paint.  

Jim Shaw
Artwork: Jim Shaw, The Hope That Blinds, 2020
Jim Shaw
The Hope That Blinds, 2020
Acrylic on muslin
124.5 x 96.5 x 4.4 cm (49 x 38 x 1 3/4 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
$ 60,000

Jim Shaw plays on oppositions: alluding to past events in service of urgent commentary on the present day, highlighting the fantastic state of contemporary American life. In The Hope That Blinds, Shaw continues his fertile commentary on conspicuous consumption and the grotesquery of late capitalist culture. Here, a woman in a virginal white nightgown gazes downwards towards a retro-futuristic home appliance that since its first outing in a 1950s advertisement has defected its use value.

Jim Shaw is celebrated for the outlandish narratives and sharp wit with which he brings his dystopian, albeit eerily familiar, universe to life. Inspired by an advertisement from a 1950s copy of Fortune magazine, in which two businessmen are illustrated in conversation, The Light of the West reflects on the inequity at the heart of contemporary society as the United States prepares for its upcoming presidential election. Shaw depicts the two floating heads as glowing ghosts in the hallway of a haunted mansion.

Artwork: Jim Shaw, The Light of the West, 2020
Jim Shaw
The Light of the West, 2020
Acrylic on muslin
177.8 x 121.9 x 4.4 cm (70 x 48 x 1 3/4 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
$ 75,000
France-Lise McGurn
Artwork: France-Lise McGurn, The Sun, 2020
France-Lise McGurn
The Sun, 2020
Oil on canvas
180 x 180 cm (70 7/8 x 70 7/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
Photo: Ben Westoby
£ 25,000
The figures that occupy France-Lise McGurn’s canvases belong to her imagination. Portrayed in various states of undress, their impassive features...

Wall painting in progress at Kunsthaus Pasquart, Biel, Switzerland, 2020.

 

The figures that occupy France-Lise McGurn’s canvases belong to her imagination. Portrayed in various states of undress, their impassive features belie the euphoria and agony of their composition. In The Sun, a female figure dives across the canvas, her back arched in ecstasy. Rendered in burnished, sunset colours, the painting delivers a wholly immersive experience, launching the viewer into an intimate, albeit bacchanalian world, in which hedonism reigns supreme. 

The artist is currently the subject of her first major museum show outside of the UK at Kunsthaus Pasquart in Biel, Switzerland. 

 

Paulina Olowska
Artwork: Paulina Olowska, Spider Painters, 2020
Paulina Olowska
Spider Painters, 2020
Gouache, oil, printed transparency film and embroidery on canvas
160 x 140 x 2.8 cm (63 x 55 1/8 x 1 1/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
$ 75,000
Throughout her multi-disciplinary practice, Polish artist Paulina Olowska has consistently explored and exposed representations of women throughout popular culture and...

Paulina Olowska studio view

Throughout her multi-disciplinary practice, Polish artist Paulina Olowska has consistently explored and exposed representations of women throughout popular culture and art history. For Olowska, the outward appearance of her female subjects is equally as important as the historical memories interwoven seamlessly throughout her collages and paintings. In Spider Painters, the artist fuses painting, embroidery and collage to create a multi-layered canvas and narrative, dissecting womanhood and its connection with the artist’s own identity and profession. 

Donna Huddleston
Artwork: Donna Huddleston, Costume Drama, 2020

Donna Huddleston, studio view 

Donna Huddleston, studio view 

Donna Huddleston, studio view 

Donna Huddleston, studio view 

Donna Huddleston, studio view 

A figurative drawing made in colour pencil, Costume Drama extends Donna Huddleston’s intensely psychological depiction of the world of acting and theatre. Formalistically, the work comprises a complex, yet sumptuous relationship between subject, colour, composition and pattern. Humour, likewise, is seldom distant from Huddleston’s work; and as its title infers Costume Drama deploys colour as a covert agent of anxiety.   

Dexter Dalwood
Artwork: Dexter Dalwood, An Inadequate Painted History of Mexico XI, 2020
Dexter Dalwood
An Inadequate Painted History of Mexico XI, 2020
Oil on canvas
31.5 x 31.5 cm (12 3/8 x 12 3/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 20,000

Dexter Dalwood: What is Really Happening, Simon Lee Gallery, London, UK, 2019. Photo: Ben Westoby

Dexter Dalwood: What is Really Happening, Simon Lee Gallery, London, UK, 2019. Photo: Ben Westoby

Dexter Dalwood: What is Really Happening, Simon Lee Gallery, London, UK, 2019. Photo: Ben Westoby

In his practice, Dexter Dalwood presents an ongoing investigation into the role of images and painting in the construction of history. In a new series inspired by Mexico, Dalwood unites observations from his time spent in the country (whilst on a residency at Casa Wabi, Oaxaca, in late 2017) with his personal brand of ‘contemporary history painting’, which weaves together visual quotations to express a space or a place that is more an abstracted mental image than a representation of the real. 

Chris Huen Sin Kan
Artwork: Chris Huen Sin Kan, MuiMui, Tess and Joel, 2020
Chris Huen Sin Kan
MuiMui, Tess and Joel, 2020
Oil on canvas
220 x 260 cm (86 5/8 x 102 3/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
Eva Herzog
£ 32,000

Chris Huen Sin Kan, Studio View

Chris Huen Sin Kan, Studio View

Chris Huen Sin Kan, Studio View

Chris Huen’s large scale oil paintings are derived from observation of his own life, portraying quotidian experiences through a fresh set of aesthetic strategies that bring the domestic and surreal into compelling partnership. His technique, imbued with both deft abstraction and the hallmarks of traditional Chinese ink painting, involves layering one dab of paint over another until the pattern on the canvas echoes the spirit of the scene. The blank spaces and fragmented forms give voice to a specific moment and the way it exists, or perhaps escapes the artist’s consciousness.

Angela Bulloch
Artwork: Angela Bulloch, Heavy Metal Stack of Six: Bustle Hedgerow, 2020
Angela Bulloch
Heavy Metal Stack of Six: Bustle Hedgerow, 2020
Zinc-coated steel, paint
300 x 80 x 50 cm (118 1/8 x 31 1/2 x 19 3/4 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
€ 120,000
Angela Bulloch’s Heavy Metal Stack of Six: Bustle Hedgerow possesses a stylized geometry that alludes to themes of minimalism and...

Detail: Angela Bulloch,   Heavy Metal Stack of Six: Bustle Hedgerow, 2020

Angela Bulloch’s Heavy Metal Stack of Six: Bustle Hedgerow possesses a stylized geometry that alludes to themes of minimalism and technology. The artist’s work is fundamentally concerned with cybernetics, alongside biological and social systems that explore the integration of humans and technology. Conceived and designed within a digital imaging programme, the reductive geometric form of the sculpture has a retro-futurity, borne of the digital realm yet recalling the classical Modernism of Constantin Brancusi’s Endless Columns. 

Josephine Pryde
Artwork: Josephine Pryde, Pacific Driftwood (Blue Filter), 2014/2020
Josephine Pryde
Pacific Driftwood (Blue Filter), 2014/2020
Black and white resin-coated print, coloured perspex
79.2 x 62.7 cm (31 1/8 x 24 3/4 in.)
Edition 2 of 3 plus 2 AP
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
Stefan Korte
$ 12,000
Pryde’s work attacks stock photographic aesthetic by technically reworking and reconfiguring images and by addressing the conditions of their display....

Installation View: Objects Recognized in Flashes, 2019, Mumok, Vienna, Austria. Photo: Klaus Pichler © mumok

 

Pryde’s work attacks stock photographic aesthetic by technically reworking and reconfiguring images and by addressing the conditions of their display. The surfaces of glossy fashion photographs are disrupted by the insertion of aluminium tubes, which emphasise their ‘objectness’ and their status as artworks. Colourful photoshop juxtapositions of MRI scans of the human foetus and macro-lens desertscapes are unnervingly loaded. They refer to the history of darkroom experimentation and to contemporary medical-imaging techniques. Pryde doesn’t reject the language of photographic imagery, rather she adopts it and layers it up. Her guinea pig portraits are inspired by ‘cute pet photography’ but her choice of subject conjures associations with laboratory research.

Mika Tajima
Artwork: Mika Tajima, Art d'Ameublement (Lednik Middendorfa), 2020
Mika Tajima
Art d'Ameublement (Lednik Middendorfa), 2020
Spray enamel, thermoformed PETG
109.2 x 83.8 cm (43 x 33 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
$ 20,000
Mika Tajima’s practice is concerned with spirituality, as well as bodily and psychic experiences of power. Tajima combines mechanical and...

Mika Tajima, Meridian (Gold), 2016, installation view in Hunter’s Point South Park, New York. Pressurized water vapor system, networked LED bulbs, real-time gold commodity indexes, custom analysis program, wood, pigment, sculpted resin. 20 x 144 x 144 inches (50.8 x 365.8 x 365.8 cm). Commissioned by SculptureCenter, New York. Courtesy the artist, 11R, New York and Taro Nasu, Tokyo. Photo: Yasunori Matsui. 

Mika Tajima’s practice is concerned with spirituality, as well as bodily and psychic experiences of power. Tajima combines mechanical and tactile modes of production in order to expose the impact of technology in our daily lives. In her Art d’Ameublement series, where each work is titled after a specific geographic location, and the selection of colour is informed by that location, Tajima spray-paints enamel on transparent shells of PETG, a variety of thermoplastic polyester, before thermoforming the shell into soft-edged, rectangular boxes. 

Gary Simmons
Artwork: Gary Simmons, Kings of Kings, 2017
Gary Simmons
Kings of Kings, 2017
Mixed media on canvas
73 x 63.5 cm (28 3/4 x 25 in.)
Courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery
$ 40,000

Gary Simmons: Green Past Gold, Simon Lee Gallery, London, 2018

Gary Simmons: Green Past Gold, Simon Lee Gallery, London, 2018

Gary Simmons: Green Past Gold, Simon Lee Gallery, London, 2018

In a recent series of his signature ‘erasure drawings’, Gary Simmons depicts the names of African-American actors and actresses of the silver screen and the titles of the silent and early ‘talkie’ films in which they starred. Smudged as though white chalk on a blackboard, the names and titles emblazoned across these works reference the role of African Americans in the history of cinema, as well as black cultural production. 

In King of Kings, Simmons spotlights the black sportsman, singer and actor, Paul Robeson, who was also an influential participant in the Harlem Renaissance and vocal political activist. Although he came to be a well-respected figure in Hollywood, Robeson was uncredited in many of the films in which he featured.

Hans-Peter Feldmann
Artwork: Hans-Peter Feldmann, Untitled

Hans-Peter Feldmann

Untitled
Oil on canvas
Diptych, each: 74.5 x 62.5 cm (29 x 24 in.)
Courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery
£ 64,000

Hans-Peter Feldmann’s works often propose a gently irreverent subversion of the structures and systems of value on which the art market and the wider art world are predicated. One consistent strand of his practice has involved the appropriation and modification of historic oil paintings – most often bourgeois portraits and genre paintings of the 19th century. Disrupting long-held assertions of the artist’s role as a unique creator, Feldmann’s appropriation of these sincere, nuanced, intimate portraits and his attention to the evocative formal qualities of paint on canvas seemingly penetrates a collective consciousness.

Inaugurated at the start of the 1970s, Hans-Peter Feldmann’s Time Series explores key themes from the artist’s practice, namely the...

Detail: Hans-Peter Feldmann, Time series - Bridge, 1970. 

Inaugurated at the start of the 1970s, Hans-Peter Feldmann’s Time Series explores key themes from the artist’s practice, namely the inspiration of everyday life and the elitist nature of image-making in an art historical context. Using rolls of 36-shot analogue film for each sequence, he made a series of consecutive images that bear almost no narrative weight, thereby interrogating the passage of time from a profoundly quotidian perspective.

Artwork: Hans-Peter Feldmann, Time series - Bridge, 1970
Hans-Peter Feldmann
Time series - Bridge, 1970
36 black and white photographs
Each: 9 x 13 cm (3 1/2 x 5 1/8 in.)
Courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery
€ 30,000
Mai-Thu Perret
Artwork: Mai-Thu Perret, Flowers in the Eye, 2020
Mai-Thu Perret
Flowers in the Eye, 2020
Haute lisse hand woven wool tapestry
193 x 143.8 cm (76 x 56 5/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
€ 40,000

Mai-Thu Perret, Flowers in the Eye, Simon Lee Gallery, New York, 2020 

Mai-Thu Perret, Flowers in the Eye, Simon Lee Gallery, New York, 2020 

Mai-Thu Perret, Flowers in the Eye, Simon Lee Gallery, New York, 2020 

Made in Mexico on a high-warp loom, Flowers in the Eye, 2020, is based on a water-colour painted by Mai-Thu Perret. The tension between fluidity and geometry in its compositions reflects the ways in which the artist’s materials intersect; the basket weaving technique used in her recent ceramic works relates directly to tapestry craft practice. In this work, Perret blends the traditional and artisanal with a postmodern aesthetic that fundamentally questions communal identity, as explored in her fictional universe, The Crystal Frontier.  

Artwork: Mai-Thu Perret, Shattered and shimmering, the moon in the water, 2020
Mai-Thu Perret
Shattered and shimmering, the moon in the water, 2020
Glazed ceramic
12 x 53 x 53 cm (4 3/4 x 20 7/8 x 20 7/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
€ 25,000

With her ceramic baskets, Mai-Thu Perret invokes the plastic nature of clay, a tactile material that maintains its relationship with the artist’s intuitive touch, even after it has been fired in the kiln. In her ceramics, Perret plays with dichotomies: the relationship between hard and soft, edges and curves, are explored in works that examine classic typologies of the genre, such as Attic pots and vases, gesturing towards traditional function without losing sight of formal innovation.

Claudio Parmiggiani
Artwork: Claudio Parmiggiani, Untitled, 2020
Claudio Parmiggiani
Untitled, 2020
Smoke and soot on board
41 x 41 cm (16 1/8 x 16 1/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
€ 30,000

Claudio Parmiggiani’s haunting paintings, made from smoke and soot, echo the inevitable passing of time, and so too, the transience of life. This haunting work reveals the silhouette of a human skull; the edges and details softly blurred. A classic memento mori, the skull a is universal symbol of death, a motif repeated throughout the annals of art history, across a multitude of cultures and practices. For Parmiggiani, the skull signifies the fragility of life, and inevitable mortality.

Artwork: Claudio Parmiggiani, Untitled, 2014
Claudio Parmiggiani
Untitled, 2014
Smoke and soot on wood
240 x 115 cm (94 1/2 x 45 1/4 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
Since the 1970s, Claudio Parmiggiani has been engaged in the development of his Delocazione, continually adding to this body of...

Claudio Parmiggiani, Simon Lee Gallery, London: 16 March - 12 April 2017

Since the 1970s, Claudio Parmiggiani has been engaged in the development of his Delocazione, continually adding to this body of work as part of his career-long quest to capture impermanence. These haunting works use powder, soot and fire to create shadows and imprints on paper and board; the feeling of absence is overwhelming, though an unmistakable human presence is felt. For Parmiggiani, books and the stories they tell are, in their ephemerality and fleeting nature, befitting of the Delocazione, in both process and spirit. 
Mel Bochner
Artwork: Mel Bochner, Money, 2015
Mel Bochner
Money, 2015
Oil on velvet in two parts
241.9 x 161.9 cm (95 1/4 x 63 3/4 in.)
Courtesy of the artist and Simon Lee Gallery
$ 250,000

Words and language as both subject and medium form the backbone of Mel Bochner’s practice. In recent years, his oeuvre has developed in tandem with a painterly practice that investigates the interrelation of form and meaning in the visual manifestation of language. In Money, the artist delivers a colourful plethora of synonyms for the word, concluding with the damning indictment, ‘root of all evil’. 

Toby Ziegler
Artwork: Toby Ziegler, MOTHER FIGURE, 2020
Toby Ziegler
MOTHER FIGURE, 2020
Paper on aluminium
243.5 x 191.5 x 3 cm (95 7/8 x 75 3/8 x 1 1/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 60,000

The work of Toby Ziegler orchestrates a continual oscillation between abstraction and figuration, and between classical composition and its digital manipulation and obfuscation. MOTHER FIGURE draws from imagery created by Ziegler over a decade ago using early 3D design software. Restricted to a black and white palette, star-like patterns articulate a space uniting depth and flatness, hard-edge qualities and the artist’s hand. Areas of the composition are erased with a sander, resulting in luminescent interruptions to the repeating landscape.

Artwork: Toby Ziegler, Nuclear family, 2020
Toby Ziegler
Nuclear family, 2020
Oil on aluminium
180.2 x 150 x 3 cm (71 x 59 1/8 x 1 1/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 50,000

Toby Ziegler’s Nuclear Family pays tribute to Jan Van Eyck’s famed Arnolfini Portrait. Here, the artist connects his interest in the abstraction of memory to a broader art historical context. Using an orbital sander to efface the surface of the panel, Ziegler directly contrasts the time-consuming process of figurative painting with the rapidity of erasure. Yet, this work gives itself to the viewer very slowly, compressing time, from the facture of the source painting and its ensuing life span, to Ziegler’s own reincarnation of the image. 

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Clare Woods
Artwork: Clare Woods, Better Than Myself, 2020
Clare Woods
Better Than Myself, 2020
Oil on aluminum
150 x 100 cm (59 1/8 x 39 3/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 33,000

In Better Than Myself, Clare Woods considers themes of submission and vulnerability. A naked female figure dominates the composition, crouched low to the ground with her back turned towards the viewer. Beneath the figure is a Persian carpet, a subtle nod to Sigmund Freud and the rugs that occupied his consulting room in Hampstead. The physical, naked vulnerability of the young woman’s pose is connected with the exposure one feels in the presence of a psychologist. Her representation oscillates between control and abandon, at once perpetrator and victim. In therapy, the patient constantly switches between these two states of mind; the artist captures this dual expression of the human condition.

Artwork: Clare Woods, New Problems 4, 2020
Clare Woods
New Problems 4, 2020
Oil on aluminium
65 x 65 cm (25 5/8 x 25 5/8 in.)
Courtesy of Simon Lee Gallery
£ 17,000

Belonging to a new body of work initiated by the artist during lockdown, New Problems 4 reflects on a period of intense isolation. Depicting an open-shuttered window seen from the inside, the composition possesses a certain air of discomfort, as once-familiar scenery adopts a new sense of claustrophobia. With little comfort to be found in the solitude of the present, Woods deployed painting as a means of communication, bridging the divide between the familiar past and an unknown future. 

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